Edouard Vuillard
Edouard Vuillard's Oil Paintings
Edouard Vuillard Museum
November 11, 1868-June 21, 1940. French painter.

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Edouard Vuillard
A child wearing blue overalls

ID: 66031

Edouard Vuillard A child wearing blue overalls
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Edouard Vuillard A child wearing blue overalls


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Edouard Vuillard

1868-1940 French Edouard Vuillard Galleries Jean-Edouard Vuillard, the son of a retired captain, spent his youth at Cuiseaux (Saone-et-Loire); in 1878 his family moved to Paris in modest circumstances. After his father\'s death, in 1884, Vuillard received a scholarship to continue his education. In the Lycee Condorcet Vuillard met Ker Xavier Roussel (also a future painter and Vuillard\'s future brother in law), Maurice Denis, musician Pierre Hermant, writer Pierre Veber and Lugne-Poe. On Roussel\'s advice he refused a military career and entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, where he met Pierre Bonnard. In 1885, Vuillard left the Lycee Condorcet and joined his closest friend Roussel at the studio of painter Diogene Maillart. There, Roussel and Vuillard received the rudiments of artistic training.  Related Paintings of Edouard Vuillard :. | Howe Chancellor and her dog | Wear black clothes woman | Princess Bibesco | Two British friends | Chair of the models |
Related Artists:
Hans Holbein
German 1497-1543 Hans Holbein Galleries Holbein always made highly detailed pencil drawings of his portrait subjects, often supplemented with ink and colored chalk. The drawings emphasize facial detail and usually did not include the hands; clothing was only indicated schematically. The outlines of these drawings were then transferred onto the support for the final painting using tiny holes in the paper through which powdered charcoal was transmitted; in later years Holbein used a kind of carbon paper. The final paintings thus had the same scale as the original drawings. Although the drawings were made as studies for paintings, they stand on their own as independent, finely wrought works of art. How many portraits have been lost can be seen from Holbein's book (nearly all pages in the Royal Collection) containing preparatory drawings for portraits - of eighty-five drawings, only a handful have surviving Holbein paintings, though often copies have survived. David Hockney has speculated in the Hockney-Falco thesis that Holbein used a concave mirror to project an image of the subject onto the drawing surface. The image was then traced. However this thesis has not met with general acceptance from art historians. A subtle ability to render character may be noted in Holbein's work, as can be seen in his portraits of Thomas Cromwell, Desiderius Erasmus, and Henry VIII. The end results are convincing as definitive images of the subjects' appearance and personality.
George Gower
1540-1596 English George Gower Gallery Little is known about his early life except that he was a grandson of Sir John Gower of Stettenham, Yorkshire. His earliest documented works are the two 1573 companion portraits of Sir Thomas Kytson and his wife Lady Kytson, now in the Tate Gallery in London. Gower painted a self-portrait in 1579 (right) that shows his coat of arms and his artist's tools of his trade. An allegorical device shows a balance with an artist's dividers outweighing the family coat of arms, "a startling claim in England where a painter was still viewed as little more than an artisan." The Armada portrait of Elizabeth I by George Gower c. 1588Gower was appointed to the position of Serjeant Painter to Queen Elizabeth in 1581. This allowed him to paint most of England??s aristocracy. The post also made him responsible for painted decoration at the royal residences, and on coaches and furniture. Among his works were a fountain (now destroyed) and the astronomical clock, both at Hampton Court Palace. He also inspected portraits of the Queen by other artists prior to their official release. Gower's best-known work is the version of the Armada Portrait of Elizabeth now at Woburn Abbey, painted to commemorate the 1588 defeat of the Spanish Armada. (A cut down version of this painting in the National Portrait Gallery (United Kingdom) is attributed to Gower; the "Drake" version is by a different hand.)
Lower Rhenish School
early fifteenth century






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